quit your b_tching

loud voices and vulgar language won't change anything

77,004 notes

birbrightsactivist:

if you want to understand the psyche of our generation take a good look at the stories we tell ourselves about the future

because it isn’t flying cars or robot dogs, it’s faceless government surveillance and worldwide pandemics and militarized police brutality and the last dregs of humanity struggling to survive

our generation isn’t self-centered, or lazy, or whatever else they wanna say about us. we are young, and we are here, and we are deeply, deeply afraid.

(via coffeebuddha)

659,542 notes

wolvensnothere:

sodomquake:

robowolves:

trimcoast:

orangemuses:

I love this post so much


my hand slipped

with their new hit song, “Randomly Searching 4 U”

I am re-reblogging just because that was so good

I think this one’s an Always Reblog, because the picture, the illustration, and the song title are just too damn perfect together.

wolvensnothere:

sodomquake:

robowolves:

trimcoast:

orangemuses:

I love this post so much

image

my hand slipped

with their new hit song, “Randomly Searching 4 U”

I am re-reblogging just because that was so good

I think this one’s an Always Reblog, because the picture, the illustration, and the song title are just too damn perfect together.

(Source: tardismetotomorrowworld, via goddammitstacey)

Filed under every time this gets me similtaniously hilarious and maddening

14 notes

feminism book recs?

moment-of-sen:

So my 13 year old step-sister is interested in learning more about feminism (I like to think this is my good influence). Does anyone know if there a book or something available that a smart 13 year old would be able to understand that could tell her the basics of…

There’s a book by bell hooks called Feminism is for Everybody that’s a fairly easy read. It has short chapters on a variety of topics and intersectionality is a big part of it. She might have to look up a few terms but anything worthwhile is worth the effort.

9,926 notes

stay-human:

I cannot recommend this video enough. This woman breaks it down perfectly.

The Stories That Europe Tells Itself About Its Colonial History

by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

“She said once she was shocked that her son while being taught Belgian history, was taught nothing about Congo. She said “They teach my son in school that he must help the poor Africans, but they don’t teach him about what Belgium did in Congo.” Of course, all countries are evasive about the past for which they feel ashamed, but I was shocked by what seemed to me not evasiveness but an erasure of history

If her son doesn’t learn that the modern Congo State began a hundred years ago as the personal property of a Belgian king, who was desperate to get wealthy from ivory and rubber, if her son doesn’t learn that the hands of Congolese people were chopped off for not producing enough resources to meet the king’s greed, if her son doesn’t learn that the Belgian government later led Congo with a deliberate emphasis on not producing an educated class, so that Congolese could become clerks and mechanics but couldn’t go to university, if her son doesn’t learn that more recently, even though it was the Americans who installed the Mobutu dictatorship, Belgium was a major force behind the scenes propping him up, if this young Belgian boy, knows nothing about these incidents, then, at some point, they would perhaps no longer have happened because the past after all is the past because we collectively acknowledged that it is so. 

This young Belgian boy would grow up to see Africa only as a place that requires his aid, his help, his charity with no complications for him. A place that can help him show how compassionate he can be, and most of all, a place whose present has no connection to Europe. 

It is not that Europe has denied its colonial history. Instead, Europe has developed a way of telling the story of its colonial history that ultimately seeks to erase that history”

(Source: fredjoiner, via swingsetindecember)

Filed under history